Tuesday, July 01, 2008

The Stolen Tomato

Many weeks ago I bought a patio tomato at the farmer's market. This was to be my first real attempt at growing edibles. There were two plants in the one pot, and I was advised to split them up and re-pot into two bigger containers. Since that would've required a trip to the store, I kept putting it off. Finally I noticed a tomato turning orange. I watched it carefully, checking it before and after work. This past weekend I purchased two larger plastic pots and a bag of potting soil. Now I have two tomato plants! Yesterday morning my first tomato was heading towards red, but when I checked it after work it was gone! I genuinely thought someone has stolen my tomato before I noticed it resting sadly in the dirt next to the pot. The bottom was soft and rotten. Why did my tomato go bad before it was ripe? And how do I prevent it from happening to the others?

9 comments:

SuzyQ said...

That is so sad! :( Bummer! I have no idea though - I am growing cherry tomatoes but mine are no where near ripe yet and I have never grown them before. So I will be interested to see what others say about how to prevent that from happening.

Nicole said...

I have two thoughts on the tomato query. First, it is likely that the tomato was injured by an insect or worm. That would have caused the early ripening and premature drop as well as the squishiness on one end. Alternatively, you have a calcium deficiency. If the latter is the case, then add a little gypsum.

kelloggssusan said...

Don't worry. There is a little chance that the rest ones will be injured too. Relax and watch them grow.

Momma Val said...

That happened to me last year. My mother said it was because I did not keep the soil consistently moist. It would get really dry then I would soak it. I had just had a baby last summer and really slacked at caring for my tomato plants. Did not bother with it this year. Perhaps a moisture issue?

Nadine said...

I looked at one of the larger green tomatoes last night and discovered it has a circle of holes/indents on the bottom. Weird. Some of the smaller ones looked OK though. Who knew growing tomatoes was this complicated?

BerryBird said...

This is a terribly sad story. If you read the Wiki how to entry on growing tomatos, it does sound very hard. Mine haven't done enough to file much of a report yet.

Green Bean said...

Hm. I've never had that happen but I'd think the rest would be okay. Here's healthy tomato vibes coming your way.

a friend said...

(As per Nicole's comment above) It may be blossom end rot. (brown discoloration on the bottom of the tomatoe which then rots.) The soil may be low in calcium (add colloidal phosphate to correct this, ask at the garden centre or nursery.) and keep the soil evenly watered. Don't alternate between bone dry and soggy wet; which may also cause the fruit to crack. Also mulching and only watering the soil will help keep diseases at bay.(by keeping the leaves dry and free of soil splashes.)

Sorry for the long winded comment Nadine.

Tomatoe plants need lots of room for their roots, which makes a stronger plant,more tomatoes etc. So one plant per pot works best. Also the more full sun it gets the better it grows.

Mary Stebbins Taitt said...

How are they doing?

I have had that problem in the past and looked it up, but I forgot the reasons I read at the time. If you continue to have the problem, try googling it.

You do have some worthy suggestions here.

My cherry tomatoes are doing well.

Some of the others fell off before ripening, but have now made newer bigger ones and the zucchinis have baby zucchinis just coming.